About the artist


About Dennis

In 1966, when my dad gave me a camera to document my upcoming Peace Corps experience, my life's direction was forever changed. I was immediately challenged by the opportunity to create a reality as I saw it. With this new-found passion, I soon abandoned whatever security my teaching career might have and plunged into photography's possibilities.

After some commercial photography training and offering freelance commercial services in news, public relations and portraiture, I began to yearn for a more creative outlet. Out of that yearning came a body of work dealing with nature's moods, designs, colors and forms that was well received. With my work widely collected through my gallery in San Francisco from the 70's into the mid 80's, I thought I was on my life path.

However,in 1985 fate intervened again on a 20th wedding anniversary trip to Paris.  My photographic sensibilities-long attuned to the natural world- instantly fell in love with the city of light. Doors, windows, housefronts, storefronts, cafe scenes all became the new subject; but mood, design, color, and form  still remained the primary focus.

Since then, I have returned at least once a year with the sole intention of capturing on film the moments and places that define the uniqueness and beauty of Europe. I hope you enjoy this body of work half as much as I enjoyed making it.


Technical Information

In 1985, when my European photography began, my film of choice was Kodachrome for its sharpness and color saturation. Most everything was shot on a tripod using Nikon cameras and lenses. I changed over to medium format Pentax67 gear and Fuji Reala 120 film  starting in 1990 until 2010. Since that point, I have been working with Canon EOS 5D Mark ii digital SLR equipment.

In 2002 I converted from the chemical darkroom to the digital darkroom for the superior color accuracy, incredible detail and archival longevity I could bring to my prints. My prints are made with Epson printers using Ultrachrome inks on Epson Enhanced Matte paper- a bright white paper base perfect for a crisp image on a non-gloss surface. Archival estimates for this ink/paper combination are in the 75-80 year range.